14 month old doesn't speak yet - BabyUniversity.com - Baby and parenting forums and reviews
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#1 of 6 Old 05-30-2001, 09:24 PM - Thead Starter
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Hi Dorothy!

Let me be the first to welcome you to our panel of experts, and the first to break in your new forum!

My son Cody is nearly 15 months old. He says very few words. "Mama", "Dada", and "baby" are about the extent of it. I remember at the same age, my daughter was beginning to put words together like "Where's Dada"?

He seemed so advanced with his motor skills -- he crawled at 5 1/2 months, walked at 9 1/2. I just assumed he'd be talking up a storm by now. Is this normal?
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#2 of 6 Old 05-30-2001, 09:44 PM
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Welcome Dorothy! Another expert! Yippee!
My daughter is 1 year old and doesn't have much language at all...other than HI and da...and those words are not really clear all the time.
When should they be developing language and how much?
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#3 of 6 Old 05-31-2001, 08:54 AM
 
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Hello Dawn: Thank you for your welcome. I am thrilled to be here. The onset of language skills varies more then any other skill. Experts set up language learning guidelines, or what most children do at certain ages. Most children will say their first word between 9 and 14 months. By 18 months, most will be able to say about 10 words. However, since many factors can affect language learning, either slowing it down or enhancing it, it is most important at 14 months that Cody's understanding and expression of language is growing and developing on a continuous basis. There is always cause for concern if a child suddenly stops talking or doesn't seem to be learning new words. Also, research has shown that girls start talking a month or two earlier than boys, their phrase and sentences may be longer, they have less grammatical errors, and larger vocabularies. This might explain why your daughter seemed more advanced at this age. Most boys catch up in these areas by four or five years. Also, it sounds as if Cody is focusing on his motor skills right now. Sometimes children develop movement first, then focus on language, rather then developing both skills at the same time. Best wishes. Dorothy
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#4 of 6 Old 06-01-2001, 08:01 AM
 
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Hello and thank you for your question. The fun is just beginning as your daughter is learning to communicate. There are really two major parts of language. One is receptive langauge or the ability to understand words and the other is expressive language which includes the words we say. Your daughter is now listening and learning to match names to people and objects, learn the meanings of action words, such as go, stop, and come, and to follow simple directions. She is developing her receptive language skills. Children always develop their understanding of language before they are able to express a word. In fact, she must hear a word many times and understand its meaning before she will say it. Usually around 9 -14 months, children say their first words. It is usually a word they have heard many times and undesrtand its meaning. Before the first word, most children do a lot of babbling or putting sounds together, like baba. They are actually practicing moving their mouths and tongues in order to strengthen their muscles for real words. You may even be hearing a steady stream of sounds, such as bamakada. Sometimes it sounds as if a child is speaking a foreign language. I would suggest that you continue to develop her understanding of language by reading, singing, and talking to her about everything as you go about your daily life activities. Sometimes, say, "show me the..." In the next several months, you will be delighted as she begins to use words to communicate. At around 16 months, most children can say about 25 words, however, they can understand about 170 words. At around 18-20 months, most children are able to say about 50 words, and continue to understand many more then they can say, and begin to put two words together, such as, "more milk." I hope this is helpful. Let me know if you have more questions. Best wishes, Dorothy
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#5 of 6 Old 06-09-2001, 11:13 PM
 
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Dorothy --

I would also like to say Hello and Welcome. Also, Jenna asked the exact question I had and I really enjoyed hearing your answer for her. Emily just turned one on the 21st and she does the usual DaDa, MaMa and Ba and speaks her little "foreign language". She has learned where things are and to associate the names we give things with the objects or person, but doesn't say them herself. I was starting to worry a little also.

I look forward to asking you further questions as she grows.
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#6 of 6 Old 06-11-2001, 08:13 AM
 
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Hi Kathy: Thank you for your kind welcome. I am glad that you found the post helpful. It is so amazing how children learn to talk and are able to learn so much in such a short amount of time. Please keep me posted on your daughter's progress. The first word is always a "show-stopping" moment that you will never forget. Best wishes to you and your family.
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